Potting Iris

Question:
“I had written Linda… about an iris…and she was able to find this lovely light purple iris as well, one which I know was in my grandmother’s and mother’s garden. I have everything in pots, so any help you can offer about container gardening iris would be more than welcome. But having these will comfort me very much.  Old fashioned fragrant iris seem to be a thing of the past, which I do hope I will correct, if only in my own garden.

Linda suggested planting in mid September due to the excessive heat we are experiencing, but where do I store them until ready to plant, do you think? Thanks for the order, can hardly wait! -Gina”


Response:

Gina,

That is wonderful that you’ve been able to secure heirloom iris which were in your mother’s and grandmother’s gardens. It’s terrific tradition and cause for you to perpetuate.

Yes, you can plant the iris in mid-September to October when temperatures cool. But don’t wait much past that time, because the bulbs will begin to dry out. You can plant the bulbs in containers. I would recommend 2 iris per 1 gallon pot with good drainage. Make sure the iris are planted just below the surface of the soil at a 45 degree angle with the top tip of each tuber visible above the soil. The bulbs should receive full sun for at least half a day in the spring when their foliage emerges and while in bloom. Let the foliage die down naturally. Pots can be moved indoors or into shaded area during dormant months. Water 2-3 times moderately when in bloom; otherwise, irrigate the pots only moderately when experiencing drought during the tubers dormant period. You can water them in when initially planted and for several weeks after that at 2-3 times a week moderately.

I hope this helps…let me know if I can help in any other way!
Michael

The specific planting instructions given above for potting iris can also be followed for giving iris a new home in the ground.

Post Author

This post was written by who has written 88 posts on The Bulb Hunter.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply